Auditions for GRIT

by Tere Martinez and Janet Hayakawa.

Seeking actors for a paid, non-union, original, educational theatre project exploring issues of identity and civil liberties. The project includes: a teacher workshop, school residencies (30-minute play, two drama-in-education workshops to be presented in multiple high school classrooms), and a videotaping of the play. Actors perform the play and facilitate the workshops.

Funded by the Kip Tokuda Memorial Washington Civil Liberties Public Education Program (through the Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction) ?this project aims to engage teachers and high school students in the World War II Japanese American incarceration story and to deepen their understanding through a theatrical experience followed by classroom-based workshops using drama in education (DiE) techniques. The goal is to reach beyond the facts, to develop empathy, to recognize the nuances and to grapple with the fragile nature of our constitutional rights. Further, this project will make connections to contemporary issues.

ROLES? – (each actor receives $4,000 for the entire project)

  • Rose – 15 years old, mixed race – (white/Asian – able to pass as white) female
  • Hisashi – 17 years old, Japanese American male

DATES AND LOCATIONS – actors to provide own transportation ?($250 travel stipend provided)

  • November 2018 – reading for high school & college students, date TBD, Olympia, WA
  • January 7-11, 2019 – rehearsal, Olympia, WA
  • January 12, 2019 – teacher workshop, Olympia, WA
  • January 14-18, 2019 – rehearsal, Olympia, WA
  • January 22 – February 28, 2019 – school residencies, South Sound Videotaping of the play TBD, South Sound

AUDITION – Interested actors should submit headshot, resume and any relevant materials to janet@janethayakawa.com. We will contact actors to schedule an audition.

PRODUCTION DESCRIPTION –

  1. Play* – 30-minutes in length immediately followed by a post play discussion to fit within one class period. Grit is set during World War II, and is the story of two teens who meet at Manzanar High School, and become quick friends. They grapple with issues of family, what it means to be Japanese American, and how they will determine their own futures. Performed in the classroom, the intimate setting will bring the action of the play close to the students and enhance the development of empathy for the plays’ characters. The plot of the play will include a variety of aspects of the Japanese American incarceration experience, while also addressing universal themes such as family, fear of the unknown, wanting to belong, and the individual versus society – so that students will be able to see their own stories and life experiences in the play. The post-play discussion with the actors will prompt students to begin to think critically about the play and the issues it raises.
  2. DiE workshops – will be conducted in the classroom using DiE techniques to deepen student understanding of the incarceration experience and issues of social injustice. Workshops will be co-facilitated with an actor from the project team and the classroom teacher. Post- play workshop #1 focuses on the wartime experience, post-play workshop #2 gets students to connect to current issues, and to raise questions that prompt further study.