This list is provided in conjunction with SoCoCulture’s September 16 membership meeting on Racial Equity Matters. Browse through and follow up on the programs, activities and readings that are of most interest to you. SoCo members can use these materials as the basis for discussions within their own organizations, or if you’d like to form a virtual discussion circle with other SoCo members on a certain book, film or program, feel free to contact Barbara McMichael if you’d like help in reaching out to others to set something up! info@sococulture.org 

MOVIES

Sunday, September 27, Noon
Rigged: The Voter Suppression Playbook – discussion of the documentary
Between 2016 and 2018, over 17 million names were purged from voter rolls across the U.S. As portrayed in the 2019 documentary Rigged: The Voter Suppression Playbook, voter roll purges are just one of many strategies used to suppress votes.

Details:

  1. Watch the film ahead of time on YouTube at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=03DGjnIkTdI
  2. Pre-register for the discussion at https://meaningfulmovies.org/events/online-discussion-of-rigged-the-voter-suppression-playbook/
  3. On September 27 and noon join the virtual discussion of the documentary film Rigged with guest speakers – Sister Quincy Howard from Network Lobby and Faithful Democracy, and Kathy Sakahara from the League of Women Voters Washington State chapter.

________________________________

Thursday, October 1, 6:30 PM
And Now We Rise
A documentary on Samuel Johns, a young Athabaskan hip hop artist, founder of the Forget Me Not Facebook Group for displaced people in Alaska, and activist for a cultural renaissance as he heals from his own legacy of historical trauma.

Details:

  1. Register ahead of time at https://kcls.bibliocommons.com/events/5f4e7b45636c1c3a006490e5
  2. On October 1 at 6:30 PM, join the virtual screening of And Now We Rise and the discussion that will follow the screening.

________________________________

13th
13th is a 2016 American documentary film by director Ava DuVernay.The film explores the “intersection of race, justice, and mass incarceration in the United States;” it is titled after the Thirteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution, adopted in 1865, which abolished slavery throughout the United States and ended involuntary servitude except as a punishment for conviction of a crime.

Details:

Watch 13th for free on your own schedule at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=krfcq5pF8u8&feature=youtu.be

________________________________

I Am Not Your Negro
In 1979, James Baldwin wrote a letter to his literary agent describing his next project, Remember This House. The book was to be a revolutionary, personal account of the lives and successive assassinations of three of his close friends–Medgar Evers, Malcolm X and Martin Luther King, Jr. At the time of Baldwin’s death in 1987, he left behind only thirty completed pages of his manuscript. But in this documentary, master filmmaker Raoul Peck envisions the book James Baldwin never finished. The result is a radical, up-to-the-minute examination of race in America, using Baldwin’s original words and flood of rich archival material.

Details:

Watch I Am Not Your Negro for free online on your own schedule using your KCLS library card – https://www.kanopy.com/product/i-am-not-your-negro

________________________________

Jim Crow of the North
Roots of racial disparities are seen through a new lens in this film that explores the origins of housing segregation in the Minneapolis area. But the story also illustrates how African-American families and leaders resisted this insidious practice, and how Black people built community — within and despite — the red lines that these restrictive covenants created.

Details:

Watch Jim Crow of the North for free online on your own schedule at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XWQfDbbQv9E

________________________________

White Like Me: Race, Racism & White Privilege in America
White Like Me, based on the work of acclaimed anti-racist educator and author Tim Wise, explores race and racism in the US through the lens of whiteness and white privilege. In a stunning reassessment of the American ideal of meritocracy and claims that we’ve entered a post-racial society, Wise offers a fascinating look back at the race-based white entitlement programs that built the American middle class, and argues that our failure as a society to come to terms with this legacy of white privilege continues to perpetuate racial inequality and race-driven political resentments today.

Details:

Watch White Like Me for free online on your own schedule using your KCLS library card – https://www.kanopy.com/product/white-me-0
________________________________

Whose Streets?
When unarmed teenager Michael Brown is killed by police and left lying in the street for hours, it marks a breaking point for the residents of St. Louis, Missouri. Grief, long-standing racial tensions and renewed anger bring residents together to hold vigil and protest. Whose Streets? is an unflinching look at the Ferguson uprising.

Details:

Watch Whose Streets? for free online on your own schedule using your KCLS library card – https://www.kanopy.com/product/whose-streets
_________________________________

We Are Muckleshoot
Film introduction to the Muckleshoot Tribe, their history and their activities.

Details:

Watch We Are Muckleshoot for free online on your own schedule at http://www.muckleshoot.nsn.us/multimedia/we-are-muckleshoot.aspx

________________________________

The Book of Negroes
The Book of Negroes is a miniseries based on a novel of the same name (but published in the U.S. under the title Someone Knows My Name) by Canadian author Lawrence Hill. This was recommended by SoCo member Gaylloyd Sisson,

Details:

A DVD of The Book of Negroes is available for checkout through KCLS, as is the book.

________________________________

Knock Down the House 
At a moment of historic volatility in American politics, four women decide to fight back, setting themselves on a journey that will change their lives and their country. Without political experience or corporate money, they build a movement of insurgent candidates challenging powerful incumbents in Congress. Their efforts result in a legendary upset.

Details: Watch Knock Down the House for free on your own schedule at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YCSo2hZRcXk&feature=youtu.be

________________________________

PROGRAMS AND WEBINARS

Monday, September 21, 6 PM
Pandemics: COVID-19, Racism and the Call to Action
A series of virtual conversations moderated by Enrique Cerna will explore the racial disparities and inequities in Washington’s public health and policing systems highlighted by COVID-19 and the Black Lives Matter movement. The first event will feature Washington State Secretary of Health John Wiesman, Dr. Julian Perez of SeaMar Community Health Centers, Yakima Valley Farmworkers Clinic CEO Carlos Olivares, and scholar and Yakama Nation Tribal Member Emily Washines for a conversation about the racially disparate impacts of COVID-19 in Washington’s communities and recommendations for how we move forward.

Details: Register for this free program at https://us02web.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_AdCHsbWKTCu9yh5zW0jdYw

________________________________

Wednesday, September 23, 12:30 PM
A Listening Session with Voices from the African-American Community
The League of Education Voters of Washington has assembled a statewide panel of African-American thought leaders to amplify the movement for racial justice. Panelists include Debrena Jackson Gandy, Dr. Thelma Jackson, Dr. Timmie Foster, Jerrall Haynes, and Rashad Norris.

Details: Register for this free program at https://zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_Y9GorU2STeKTnuaZI26fsw

_________________________________

Bookmarks & Landmarks book discussion series
The struggles that different groups of Americans have undertaken in order to win the right to vote is the subject of three programs listed below in this year’s annual Bookmarks & Landmarks series. These programs are free to attend.

Saturday, September 26, 11 AM
B&L: Women’s Votes, Women’s Voices – Shanna Stevenson
In 1883, women in Washington Territory briefly had the right to vote. But when a territorial court decision took that franchise away from them, suffragists organized and embarked on a decades-long battle to win back that right. And when they succeeded in 1910, the news revitalized the nationwide movement for women’s suffrage. There is some limited discussion of how non-white women fared during these campaigns. This program is being produced as a collaboration between SoCoCulture, KCLS and the Neely Mansion Association.

Details:

  1. Read Women’s Votes, Women’s Voices by Shanna Stevenson ahead of time – the book is available through KCLS
  2. Register for the B&L discussion at https://kcls.bibliocommons.com/events/5f307ccb1622433a0051276b
  3. On September 26 at 11 AM, join author Shanna Stevenson for an interactive discussion of the book via Zoom.

________

Saturday, October 10, 11 AM
B&L: March (Books 1, 2 and 3) – Congressman John Lewis

March is an award-winning trilogy of graphic novels – these “comics with a conscience” tell how Lewis, as a young man, worked alongside Dr. Martin Luther King and others to secure voting rights for Black Americans during the Civil Rights movement in the 1950s and 1960s. This program is being produced as a collaboration between SoCoCulture, the Kent Historical Museum, Kent Black Action Commission and KCLS.

Details:

  1. Read March (Books 1, 2 and 3) ahead of time – these books are available through KCLS
  2. Register for the B&L discussion at https://kcls.bibliocommons.com/events/5f652d902472064500b6acf8
  3. On October 10 at 11 AM, join us for an interactive discussion of these books via Zoom.

_____

Saturday, October 17, 2 PM
B&L: Stranger: The Challenge of a Latino Immigrant in the Trump Era – Jorge Ramos

An Emmy-winning journalist, syndicated columnist, and Univision anchor, Ramos attained even greater visibility in August 2015 when presidential candidate Donald Trump had him thrown out of a press conference in Iowa. Ramos tells the full story of that confrontation in this candid memoir and reflects on why, even though he has lived in the U.S. for 35 years and has become a citizen and a father, he still feels like a stranger. He recounts his decision to leave Mexico as a fledgling journalist to escape state censorship, asserts journalism’s role as a “public service,” and expresses his love for the U.S., an “experiment . . . based on the extraordinary process of converting ‘others’ into ‘us.'” This program is being produced as a collaboration between SoCoCulture, KCLS and the SeaMar Museum of Chicano/a/Latino/a Culture.

Details:

  1. Read Stranger: The Challenge of a Latino Immigrant in the Trump Era by Jorge Ramos ahead of time – the book is available through KCLS
  2. Register for the B&L discussion at https://kcls.bibliocommons.com/events/5f4e83a3773d7e0304cf9a4a
  3. Ahead of time you may wish to see some of the additional resources on the SeaMar Museum’s website – https://seamarmuseum.squarespace.com/bookmarks-landmarks-event – where you will find
    • A videotaped interview with Jorge Ramos
    • A lecture by Edwin Lindo, JD, a Faculty Lecturer at the Department of Family      Medicine, University of Washington School of Medicine and School of Law, on the
    different uses, meanings, and impact of the term “race” in the U.S.
  4. On October 17 at 2 PM, join with special guests SeaTac City Councilmember Senayet Negusse and Burien Mayor Jimmy Matta for an interactive discussion of the book and what it’s like to get engaged in politics at a time when there is backlash to immigrants in this country.

________________________________

October 8, 11:30 AM
Racial Equity in Education
A statewide virtual free convening sponsored by the League of Education Voters. Dr. Benjamin Danielson, director of Odessa Brown Children’s Clinic in Seattle, explores the role of equity, diversity, access and inclusion in the public education system. Then there will be small group sessions to discuss the issues.

Details:

Register for this free program at https://zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_frYTGt4SSxmx8VJdHYoA7g?eType=EmailBlastContent&eId=9713311f-9d8d-46f7-a327-b004718b75cc

________________________________

Virtual Webinar with Superintendents from Across the State on Racial Equity and Going Back to School
Highline Public Schools Superintendent Dr. Susan Enfield, Kent School District Superintendent Dr. Calvin Watts, Northshore School District Superintendent Dr. Michelle Reid, Bellingham Public Schools Superintendent Dr. Greg Baker, Kennewick School District SuperintendentDr. Traci Pierce, and Davenport School District Superintendent Jim Kowalkowski share how racial equity is being addressed during this historic time, describe what school will look like in their districts for the start of the 2020-21 school year, outline what kinds of support school districts in Washington need from the state as the school year gets underway, and answer questions. 

Details:

Watch for free online on your own schedule at https://educationvoters.org/2020/08/17/watch-our-levinar-with-superintendents-from-across-washington-state-on-racial-equity-and-going-back-to-school/

________________________________

Virtual Round Table: Environmental Justice Community Impacts from the Coronavirus Health & Economic Crises
Air and water pollution disproportionately hurt people of color. Decades of building waste incinerators, chemical refineries and other heavily polluting industries in minority neighborhoods – and ignoring the needs of rural minority communities – have condemned generations to higher rates of sickness and poverty.

Details:

Watch for free online on your own schedule at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ws2BjA6JG-c&feature=youtu.be

________________________________

Black Lives Matter and (the American) Revolution
The wave of anti-racist protests sweeping across the U.S. since the killing of George Floyd on May 25th has propelled issues of discrimination, police violence, and social justice into the national spotlight with an urgency that echoes the civil rights movement of the 1960s. A diverse cross-section of Americans has taken to the streets, despite the risks posed by the COVID-19 pandemic. Demands for the removal of monuments commemorating people and events rooted in the repugnant ideology of white supremacy are again on the rise, and many history institutions are engaged in the painful but essential process of reckoning with the role racism played in their own individual histories. Against this backdrop, preparations for marking the 250th anniversary of the American Revolution continue. How will this renewed social justice movement impact the way history organizations commemorate this anniversary? How will it impact the ways in which Americans respond?

Details:

Watch online on your own schedule. Cost: $5-$10, but free to anyone by using promo code shared on the website. https://learn.aaslh.org/products/recorded-webinar-aaslh-conversations-black-lives-matter-and-the-american-revolution

________________________________

BOOKS AND OTHER READING

Resources provided by Kent librarian José Garcia:

  1. Article: Reflections on Cultural Humility – https://www.apa.org/pi/families/resources/newsletter/2013/08/cultural-humility
  2. The Characteristics of White Supremacy Culture – https://www.showingupforracialjustice.org/white-supremacy-culture-characteristics.html
  3. Awake to Woke to Work: Building a Race Equity Culture – https://www.equityinthecenter.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/04/Equity-in-Center-Awake-Woke-Work-2019-final-1.pdf
  4. Guiding questions for equity task forces – https://drive.google.com/file/d/1lOFbjMgs5A3SDqciMj6PJDBP6p4neOuO/view
  5. Native land map – https://native-land.ca/

________________________________

Federal Way librarian Cassandra Harlan has compiled a racial equity reading list for your consideration: https://kcls.bibliocommons.com/list/share/282383257_fw_librarian/1708235869_anti-racism_reading_list

________________________________

Because South King County also has such significant immigrant populations, you might also find these KCLS reading lists helpful:
https://kcls.bibliocommons.com/list/show/209743155_kcls_librarians_diversity/216496455_kcls_recommends_diversity_-_the_immigrant_experience
and
https://kcls.bibliocommons.com/list/share/209743155_kcls_librarians_diversity/371029478_the_immigrant_experience_-_fiction

________________________________

Additional reading recommendations from Barbara McMichael

  1. Across That Bridge – John Lewis
  2. Things That Make White People Uncomfortable – Michael Bennett
  3. Heart Berries – Terese Marie Mailhot
  4. All the Real Indians Died Off – Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz
  5. Bitterroot – Susan Devan Harness
  6. Environmental Justice for All article – https://view.joomag.com/pr-for-people-monthly-september-2020/0913484001599980992?short&
  7. https://www.realrentduwamish.org/determine-rent.html
  8. The New York Times 1619 Project – https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2019/08/14/magazine/1619-america-slavery.html
  9. Welcome to the New World – Jake Halpern, illustrated by Michael Sloan
  10. And one final non-reading suggestion: the next time you get hungry and are too tired to cook, visit the new Spice Bridge in Tukwila, order Family Meals to Go through Project Feast in Kent, or patronize a local immigrant-owned-and-operated restaurant and become acquainted with the folks who are providing you with your meal.

________________________________

Additional reading recommendation from Olisa Enrico-Johnson

My Grandmother’s Hands – Resmaa Menakem

________________________________

Additional reading recommendation from Bennyroyce Royon

The Artist as Citizen – Dr. Joseph Polisi

________________________________

 

Do you have additional recommendations to add to this list? Contact Barbara McMichael at info@sococulture.org or 206-878-6912 with your ideas!

And if you’d like to participate in or organize a discussion group around a particular book or film, let us know and we’ll try to help you coordinate! Again, contact Barbara via phone/e-mail listed above.

 

And here is the link to the discussion thread that was happening in our Chat Room during the SoCo meeting:  Zoom Chat_SoCoCulture 9.16.2020-1