This list is provided in conjunction with SoCoCulture’s September 16, 2020 membership meeting on Racial Equity Matters. Browse through and follow up on the programs, activities and readings that are of most interest to you. SoCo members can use these materials as the basis for discussions within their own organizations, or if you’d like to form a virtual discussion circle with other SoCo members on a certain book, film or program, feel free to contact Barbara McMichael if you’d like help in reaching out to others to set something up! info@sococulture.org 

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MOVIES

Tuesday, November 10, 7 PM
Latinos Beyond Reel

Sponsored by Meaningful Movies and KCLS,Latinos Beyond Reel focuses on Latino representation in the media industry and how those images create real life consequences.

Details:

Ahead of time, watch the film, Latinos Beyond Reel: Challenging a Media Stereotype, on Kanopy at home (this is free via KCLS), then join the online discussion on November 10, 7 PM, with Seattle-based film critic Lance Rhoades

Register at kcls.org.

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What’s Happening in Kent?
This documentary was filmed in July/August 2020 by Kent native Logan Ellis, who is also the co-founder of Theatre Battery. This project showcases the stories of various nonprofits and BIPOC leaders in Kent who share their perspectives relating to current social challenges including the global pandemic, food insecurity, racism, and more.
Details:
Watch What’s Happening in Kent? for free and on your own schedule at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YW7KcV2i11o

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13th
13th is a 2016 American documentary film by director Ava DuVernay.The film explores the “intersection of race, justice, and mass incarceration in the United States;” it is titled after the Thirteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution, adopted in 1865, which abolished slavery throughout the United States and ended involuntary servitude except as a punishment for conviction of a crime.

Details:

Watch 13th for free on your own schedule at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=krfcq5pF8u8&feature=youtu.be

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I Am Not Your Negro
In 1979, James Baldwin wrote a letter to his literary agent describing his next project, Remember This House. The book was to be a revolutionary, personal account of the lives and successive assassinations of three of his close friends–Medgar Evers, Malcolm X and Martin Luther King, Jr. At the time of Baldwin’s death in 1987, he left behind only thirty completed pages of his manuscript. But in this documentary, master filmmaker Raoul Peck envisions the book James Baldwin never finished. The result is a radical, up-to-the-minute examination of race in America, using Baldwin’s original words and flood of rich archival material.

Details:

Watch I Am Not Your Negro for free online on your own schedule using your KCLS library card – https://www.kanopy.com/product/i-am-not-your-negro

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Jim Crow of the North
Roots of racial disparities are seen through a new lens in this film that explores the origins of housing segregation in the Minneapolis area. But the story also illustrates how African-American families and leaders resisted this insidious practice, and how Black people built community — within and despite — the red lines that these restrictive covenants created.

Details:

Watch Jim Crow of the North for free online on your own schedule at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XWQfDbbQv9E

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White Like Me: Race, Racism & White Privilege in America
White Like Me, based on the work of acclaimed anti-racist educator and author Tim Wise, explores race and racism in the US through the lens of whiteness and white privilege. In a stunning reassessment of the American ideal of meritocracy and claims that we’ve entered a post-racial society, Wise offers a fascinating look back at the race-based white entitlement programs that built the American middle class, and argues that our failure as a society to come to terms with this legacy of white privilege continues to perpetuate racial inequality and race-driven political resentments today.

Details:

Watch White Like Me for free online on your own schedule using your KCLS library card – https://www.kanopy.com/product/white-me-0
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Whose Streets?
When unarmed teenager Michael Brown is killed by police and left lying in the street for hours, it marks a breaking point for the residents of St. Louis, Missouri. Grief, long-standing racial tensions and renewed anger bring residents together to hold vigil and protest. Whose Streets? is an unflinching look at the Ferguson uprising.

Details:

Watch Whose Streets? for free online on your own schedule using your KCLS library card – https://www.kanopy.com/product/whose-streets
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We Are Muckleshoot
Film introduction to the Muckleshoot Tribe, their history and their activities.

Details:

Watch We Are Muckleshoot for free online on your own schedule at http://www.muckleshoot.nsn.us/multimedia/we-are-muckleshoot.aspx

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The Book of Negroes
The Book of Negroes is a miniseries based on a novel of the same name (but published in the U.S. under the title Someone Knows My Name) by Canadian author Lawrence Hill. This was recommended by SoCo member Gaylloyd Sisson,

Details:

A DVD of The Book of Negroes is available for checkout through KCLS, as is the book.

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Knock Down the House 
At a moment of historic volatility in American politics, four women decide to fight back, setting themselves on a journey that will change their lives and their country. Without political experience or corporate money, they build a movement of insurgent candidates challenging powerful incumbents in Congress. Their efforts result in a legendary upset.

Details:

Watch Knock Down the House for free on your own schedule at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YCSo2hZRcXk&feature=youtu.be

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Rigged: The Voter Suppression Playbook – discussion of the documentary
Between 2016 and 2018, over 17 million names were purged from voter rolls across the U.S. As portrayed in the 2019 documentary Rigged: The Voter Suppression Playbook, voter roll purges are just one of many strategies used to suppress votes.

Details:

Watch Rigged: The Voter Suppression Playbook on your own schedule at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=03DGjnIkTdI

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PROGRAMS AND WEBINARS


Various dates in October and November

Green River College 2020-2021 One Book Conversation on the U.S. Carceral System and Injustice

For background information read

  • Just Mercy: A Story of Justice and Redemption by Bryan Stevenson
  • Becoming Ms. Burton: From Prison to Recovery to Leading the Fight for Incarcerated Women by Susan Burton and Cari Lynn

However, you do not need to read the books to attend the following free community conversations via Zoom.

October 8 – Mass Incarceration in the Land of the Free
October 21 – Black Lives Matter – The Racial Justice Uprising and Movement
October 29 – The Juvenile Prison Pipeline
November 4 – Second Chances – Retribution and Reform
November 19 – Imagining a Prison to College Pipeline

Details:

For more details on these programs and links to register, visit sococulture.org/calendar/ 

 

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Virtual Webinar with Superintendents from Across the State on Racial Equity and Going Back to School
Highline Public Schools Superintendent Dr. Susan Enfield, Kent School District Superintendent Dr. Calvin Watts, Northshore School District Superintendent Dr. Michelle Reid, Bellingham Public Schools Superintendent Dr. Greg Baker, Kennewick School District SuperintendentDr. Traci Pierce, and Davenport School District Superintendent Jim Kowalkowski share how racial equity is being addressed during this historic time, describe what school will look like in their districts for the start of the 2020-21 school year, outline what kinds of support school districts in Washington need from the state as the school year gets underway, and answer questions. 

Details:

Watch for free online on your own schedule at https://educationvoters.org/2020/08/17/watch-our-levinar-with-superintendents-from-across-washington-state-on-racial-equity-and-going-back-to-school/

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Virtual Round Table: Environmental Justice Community Impacts from the Coronavirus Health & Economic Crises
Air and water pollution disproportionately hurt people of color. Decades of building waste incinerators, chemical refineries and other heavily polluting industries in minority neighborhoods – and ignoring the needs of rural minority communities – have condemned generations to higher rates of sickness and poverty.

Details:

Watch for free online on your own schedule at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ws2BjA6JG-c&feature=youtu.be

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Black Lives Matter and (the American) Revolution
The wave of anti-racist protests sweeping across the U.S. since the killing of George Floyd on May 25th has propelled issues of discrimination, police violence, and social justice into the national spotlight with an urgency that echoes the civil rights movement of the 1960s. A diverse cross-section of Americans has taken to the streets, despite the risks posed by the COVID-19 pandemic. Demands for the removal of monuments commemorating people and events rooted in the repugnant ideology of white supremacy are again on the rise, and many history institutions are engaged in the painful but essential process of reckoning with the role racism played in their own individual histories. Against this backdrop, preparations for marking the 250th anniversary of the American Revolution continue. How will this renewed social justice movement impact the way history organizations commemorate this anniversary? How will it impact the ways in which Americans respond?

Details:

Watch online on your own schedule. Cost: $5-$10, but free to anyone by using promo code shared on the website. https://learn.aaslh.org/products/recorded-webinar-aaslh-conversations-black-lives-matter-and-the-american-revolution

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Podcast – Ibram X. Kendi on How to Be an Antiracist
League of Education Voters Communications Director Arik Korman asks Dr. Ibram X. Kendi, #1 New York Times bestselling author of How to Be an Antiracist, the Andrew W. Mellon Professor in the Humanities and Founding Director of the Boston University Center for Antiracist Research, contributing writer at The Atlantic, and CBS News correspondent, how we can be anti-racist ourselves, how, in Dr. Kendi’s words, he evolved from internalizing racist thoughts to being an anti-racist, and what we can do to create a more equitable, anti-racist society.

Details:

Listen here on your own schedule: https://educationvoters.org/2020/07/15/podcast-ibram-x-kendi-on-how-to-be-an-antiracist/

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BOOKS AND OTHER READING

 

Resources provided by Kent librarian José Garcia:

  1. Article: Reflections on Cultural Humility – https://www.apa.org/pi/families/resources/newsletter/2013/08/cultural-humility
  2. The Characteristics of White Supremacy Culture – https://www.showingupforracialjustice.org/white-supremacy-culture-characteristics.html
  3. Awake to Woke to Work: Building a Race Equity Culture – https://www.equityinthecenter.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/04/Equity-in-Center-Awake-Woke-Work-2019-final-1.pdf
  4. Guiding questions for equity task forces – https://drive.google.com/file/d/1lOFbjMgs5A3SDqciMj6PJDBP6p4neOuO/view
  5. Native land map – https://native-land.ca/

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Federal Way librarian Cassandra Harlan has compiled a racial equity reading list for your consideration:

https://kcls.bibliocommons.com/list/share/282383257_fw_librarian/1708235869_anti-racism_reading_list

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Because South King County also has such significant immigrant populations, you might also find these KCLS reading lists helpful:

https://kcls.bibliocommons.com/list/show/209743155_kcls_librarians_diversity/216496455_kcls_recommends_diversity_-_the_immigrant_experience
and
https://kcls.bibliocommons.com/list/share/209743155_kcls_librarians_diversity/371029478_the_immigrant_experience_-_fiction

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Additional reading recommendations from Barbara McMichael

  1. Across That Bridge – John Lewis
  2. Things That Make White People Uncomfortable – Michael Bennett
  3. Heart Berries – Terese Marie Mailhot
  4. All the Real Indians Died Off – Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz
  5. Bitterroot – Susan Devan Harness
  6. Environmental Justice for All article – https://view.joomag.com/pr-for-people-monthly-september-2020/0913484001599980992?short&
  7. https://www.realrentduwamish.org/determine-rent.html
  8. The New York Times 1619 Project – https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2019/08/14/magazine/1619-america-slavery.html
  9. Welcome to the New World – Jake Halpern, illustrated by Michael Sloan
  10. Proud Shoes – Pauli Murray

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Additional reading recommendation from Olisa Enrico-Johnson

My Grandmother’s Hands – Resmaa Menakem

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Additional reading recommendation from Bennyroyce Royon

The Artist as Citizen – Dr. Joseph Polisi

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Additional reading recommendation from ACLU/Washington

Just Us: An American Conversation – Claudia Rankine

 

Do you have additional recommendations to add to this list? Contact Barbara McMichael at info@sococulture.org or 206-878-6912 with your ideas!

And if you’d like to participate in or organize a discussion group around a particular book or film, let us know and we’ll try to help you coordinate! Again, contact Barbara via phone/e-mail listed above.

 

And here is the link to the discussion thread that was happening in our Chat Room during the SoCo membership meeting in September 2020:  Zoom Chat_SoCoCulture 9.16.2020-1